Minding My Own Beeswax

Making honey is no small feat for a bee.  Foraging bees must first visit many flowers to collect nectar.  Then, it is brought to the hive where a worker bee takes the nectar and places it in one of the openings in the specially prepared comb.   Bees then fan the nectar with their wings to remove as much liquid as possible.  Somehow they know when the honey is ready and then secrete a substance which covers the honey.  This substance will harden and become beeswax.

Bees instictively know when to cap honey with beeswax. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

beeswax

To harvest honey, the beeswax must be removed

Removing beeswax capping is the first step to harvesting honey. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

which opens the chambers and allows the honey to flow out.

These beeswax cappings are placed on a screen, in a tub, and strained for the honey it contains.  What’s left is this

Cappings from honey supers will be melted down to make beeswax. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

Cappings off honey supers.

At this point, these cappings can be given back to the bees for food (which I usually do)or heated and strained (rendered) to make the pretty, yellow beeswax used in candles and cosmetics.

This year I decided to try my hand at rendering wax.   Instead of buying an expensive melter, I opted for a home-made version after I found this large styrofoam container and glass window at my local recycling center.

I found this styrofoam cooler at my recycling center and made it a beeswax melter. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

I dug through my cabinet and found some old, plastic bowls.  I placed an inch of water in the bottom, rubber banded a paper towel over the top, and placed the cappings on top.

beeswax4

I placed the containers in the cooler and covered it with the glass window and left for work.  The outdoor temps need to be at least eighty degrees for this to work which is no problem this time of year in Arkansas.

I found this styrofoam cooler and glass lid at my recycling center and made it a beeswax melter. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

When  I got home, my pile of cappings had melted down to this.

Slum gum is what's left after the wax has melted through the filter. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

As you can see, the paper towel acts as a filter as the wax melts down (you can use cheesecloth, too but I didn’t have any) and the water in the bowl helps separate the wax from residual honey and other impurities.  When the process is complete, rendered beeswax will be floating on top.

Making beeswax from recycled materials. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

As you can imagine, these containers were super hot when I removed them from the cooler and everything inside was liquid.  I left the bowls on the counter overnight to completely cool off.   The next morning, the wax had hardened on top and I was able to loosen the plastic bowl and remove it.  Making beeswax from recycled materials. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

There still seemed to be some debris in the wax, so I repeated the entire process again and am much happier with the second rendering.

Making beeswax from recycled materials. https://theblondegardener.com/2017/07/23/minding-my-own-beeswax/

I’m not sure what will become of this beautiful wax,  but the process was simple enough to do and only required a few items rescued from the trash.  Just goes to show that one man’s trash is another woman’s wax melter!

 

 

About the blonde gardener

I'm an Arkansas girl born and raised. I garden in the beautiful Northwest part of the state (zone 6b or 7) surrounded by the Ozark Mountains. My favorite part about the area is we have 4 distinct seasons and are able to enjoy a variety of activities. My main passion is gardening but I also enjoy hiking, birding, 4-wheeling and motorcycle trips. Basically anything outside. Thanks for stopping by! Brenda
This entry was posted in Arkansas, Arkansas blogger, Bees, do it yourself, Farm life, Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Minding My Own Beeswax

  1. Nikki Gunn says:

    Wow, that is so interesting! Imagine how they must do this on a bigger scale. Beautiful wax! You inspire me to get started bee keeping! It has intimidated me for so long. Thanks for all the bee information!

    Like

  2. Can you still feed the wax that you didn’t melt back to the bees?

    Like

  3. Pingback: Minding My Own Beeswax by The Blonde Gardener | Beekeeping365

  4. Ami M. Lee says:

    This is so very interesting. How handy to be able to do it cost effectively too. Great post!

    Like

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