Bryce Canyon

When we entered Bryce Canyon, the sky had finally cleared.  But, as you can see, clouds are looming in the distance.
bryce canyon
As we drove through the canyon, the rain came and went and came and went.  Clear around one corner, drizzling the next.   Not enough to dampen our spirits, but just enough to be irritating.
It’s hard to be irritated, though, when you see scenery such as this.
bryce canyon
Looking throughout the canyon, you feel as if you have entered another dimension or planet.    Every pullout view is different and unique.  I tried to pick just a few of my favorite pictures, but gave up.  All I can say is, if you get a chance to see Bryce Canyon, stop at every pullout and walk around.  It’s worth the effort.
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I made friends with a big, black crow.  One with nature, that’s me.
bryce canyon
The jagged rock formations you see are called hoodoos.  (I imagine whoever came up with this name is also responsible for the term doodad.)  They have also been referred to as Fairy Chimneys, Goblins and, in French, they are called demoiselles coiffées (“ladies with hairdos”)

bryce canyon
Oui
Hoodoos happen when rock is exposed to sun, wind, rain, snow, and ice for a million plus years.  Experts say that two to four feet of hoodoos disappear every one hundred years.
bryce canyon
According to their math, they estimate Bryce Canyon will be gone in approximately three million years (give or take)
So, for now, lets enjoy the view.
bryce canyon
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bryce canyon motorcycle