Canning Beans in Winter

Every year, the garden seems to have a different vegetable star.

Last summer was deemed the  summer of tomatoes and pinto beans.  I had so many tomatoes, I ended up picking them straight from the garden, bagging them in Ziploc bags and tossing them in the freezer.  I did the same with the beans.  By the end of summer, I had about 15 one gallon bags of tomatoes and a couple of gallon bags of pinto beans in the freezer.

I’ve finally got the tomatoes canned (post on this later) and this weekend seemed like a good time to take care of the beans.

snow feb, 28, 2015

If you’ve never used a pressure cooker/canner before, be sure to look through the book that came with the cooker before starting.  Another book I refer to all the time is the Ball Blue Book Guide for Canning.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/In the recipes, you will see directions such as, process pints for 40 minutes at 10 pounds pressure.  To know what pressure you need, my cooker (which is really, really old) has this on top of the lid.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/This knob comes apart so you can adjust the pressure as needed.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

You will have a guide in your canning book that will break this down for you.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/Pinto beans call for 10 psi, so the top of my cooker looks like this

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

I took the beans out of the freezer a couple of days ago, (I’m not sure if they actually needed to thaw or not.  I mainly did it as a reminder so I wouldn’t  forget to soak them overnight.)

I ‘ve figured out over the years that 9 cups of dried beans will yield about 14-15 pints of beans or 3 cookers full.  So, I measured out the beans, placed them in a large stockpot and covered them with cold water.  Cover the pot and let them sit on top of the stove for 12-18 hours.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

After they’ve soaked overnight, drain the water from the beans, rinse, and place back in the stockpot.  Cover with cold water and bring to a boil.  Boil for 30 minutes.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

During this time, get your jars, lids, and caps ready.  I like to put my jars in the dishwasher to clean, sterilize them, and keep them hot.  By the time the jars are going through the dry cycle, the beans are usually done cooking.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

You can also place the jars in large pan of water and heat.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

I’ve also warmed them in the microwave, too.  The point is they need to be very warm so the jars don’t bust when hot beans go in.

Put the lids and caps in a pan of water and heat.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

When everything is ready to go, get a hot jar and place 1/2 tsp. canning salt in the bottom of the jar.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/ Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

Place a funnel (optional, but helpful) on top of the jar and pour in beans.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

No broth at this point, just beans.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

When the jar is full of beans, pour in the liquid leaving about 1 inch of space (this is called headspace).

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

Next, remove any air bubbles in the jar using a butter knife or something similar.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

This is done by inserting the knife on all four “sides” of the jar and then right in the middle.

Wipe the rim of the jar with a damp cloth or paper towel.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

Remove a lid from the hot water using this magnetic tool

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

and place on the rim of the jar.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

Remove a cap from the hot water (with the same tool) and screw tightly on the jar.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

Place the jar in the pressure canner that has about 2 inches of water in the bottom.

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/My cooker is small and will hold 5 regular-mouth jars or 4 wide-mouth jars.

Make sure the jars are not touching each other or the sides of the cooker

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/and that the water in the cooker goes up the jar about 3 inches.

Put the lid on the cooker and secure.

Turn on the heat.  When the psi indicator starts to “hiss” at a steady rate (this takes about 15 minutes to happen), begin to time.  It will sound like this:

For pinto beans, the instructions say to process for 1 hour 15 minutes at 10 psi.  Set the timer.  That’s a long time (for me) and I tend to get started on other things and lose track of time.  I usually set the timer on the oven and my phone.

When the time is up, turn off the heat and let the cooker cool down.  Don’t move the cooker at this point.  You will not be able to open the lid until the pressure is down and this will take about 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes, gently try to open the lid.  If it doesn’t give, leave it for a few more minutes and try again.  When the pressure is down, it will open easily.

Take out the beans with your jar gripper

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

 and place them on a towel.  Let your jars sit undisturbed for 24 hours.  During this time you will hear popping or pinging.  This means your jars have sealed!

Canning is a great way to preserve your summer harvest  https://theblondegardener.com/2015/03/01/canning-beans-in-winter/

The next day, check the tops by running your finger across the top.  If you can push the lid down and it pops back, the jar didn’t seal and you need to put it in the refrigerator and eat within a couple of days.  If the lid does not pop back, your jars have sealed and you can put them in the cupboard or pantry.

Allen is always giving me a hard time about canning.  He reminds me I could  buy a can of beans for $.50 and wouldn’t have to spend the whole day canning.

That’s true, but I don’t mind spending a snowy day in the kitchen.

bird snow feb 2015

And, I figure if I go to all the trouble to have fresh food in the summer, the least I can do is enjoy it in the winter.  I love being able to come home, open a jar, heat it up, make a pan of cornbread and have a meal in 30 minutes or less.  It doesn’t get any easier than that.

The pinto beans I use are the Lina Sisco Bird Egg bean that I’ve talked about here.  Super easy to grow, easy to harvest, and easy to preserve either at the time you pick them or in the dead of winter.

birds snow feb 28 2015

Who’s looking forward to spring?

 

Brenda

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the blonde gardener

I'm an Arkansas girl born and raised. I garden in the beautiful Northwest part of the state (zone 6b or 7) surrounded by the Ozark Mountains. My favorite part about the area is we have 4 distinct seasons and are able to enjoy a variety of activities. My main passion is gardening but I also enjoy hiking, birding, 4-wheeling and motorcycle trips. Basically anything outside. Thanks for stopping by! Brenda
This entry was posted in canning, Garden, Pinto Beans and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

20 Responses to Canning Beans in Winter

  1. Me, me….I am looking forward to spring. What a yummy way to spend winter.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nikki G says:

    I’m sitting here looking out the window at the snow and it is lovely, but I can hardly wait to throw some seeds in the ground and start sweating in my garden again! Ha!

    Like

  3. bittster says:

    heh heh, I’ve never looked at a bean canning post and thought ‘yummy’. Must be the weather! Next year I’ll give the dry beans a try. You’ve inspired me, plus it’s much less stress than bees 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Enjoying a little drizzle outdoors today, and it really seems more like a spring rain than something that’ll turn into freezing rain. Hope it.
    We grow cannelini beans and love them canned. I use pints, though, since I have more of them and often only need that much, say, for minestrone or nachos.
    Where do you get a quart of beans for fifty cents?! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  5. lostinavalonor says:

    This is wonderful—thank you! My husband bought me a pressure canner LAST Christmas and I’m still too chicken to use it! I’ll pin this for later.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is intimidating at first. I was lucky to learn from my mom and grandmother and I spent many summers “interning” with them 🙂 Also, each county has a home extension agent within the Cooperative Extension office and he/she is a wealth of information about canning. Our agent also offers free canning classes once or twice a year. Good luck and if you have any questions, I’d be more than happy to help.
      Brenda

      Like

  6. Oh I love pinto beans. I would love to learn to can. Nothing like canned veggies all winter.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. What a process! I’ve never canned anything, but this sounds like quite the adventure. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pingback: Cucumbers, Okra, and Beans Oh My! | The Blonde Gardener

  9. Dawn says:

    I loved watching the canning process, Brenda! It looks like a great thing to do when we are cooped up inside during the winter. You had an amazing harvest of tomatoes and pinto beans last summer! It must be so rewarding to enjoy them all year long. My flower and herb gardens are still buried under lots of snow… but warmer temperatures are headed our way next week. Spring is on the way! ♡

    Like

  10. Wow. Cool canner! 🙂
    You do not HAVE to thaw bean. You can simply rinse in hot water. In fact, I never wash my beans after shelling for the freezer: I just throw them into the bags and when I get some out, I then rinse them in hot water. Works for me.
    I do this with undried seed, too, such as purple-hull peas, if I have too many to keep up with or too few to can at first. Once I’ve frozen a decent amount, just rinse in hot water, bottle and pressure. 🙂

    Like

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